The mildly-invasive procedure that helps end-stage renal disease patients

As previously described by Joe Cosgrove, there are several stages of renal disease; there are, in fact, different treatments for each patient. However, to all those patients currently undergoing hemodialysis after being diagnosed with end-stage renal disease, unrestrained and free blood circulation is practically the whole world for them.

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Image courtesy of Pixabay at Pexels.com

The process of hemodialysis, as previously mentioned in this blog is all about having a machine replace an individual’s kidneys. It mimics the human kidney function by pumping blood from an individual’s body all the way through a series of tubes, thusly cleansing it by getting rid of all the accumulated waste so that it can be returned to the body via an additional tube. This machine, also commonly referred to as a hemodialyzer, requires an additional procedure in order to create an easy access into the patient’s blood flow. When a vein or an artery develops a blockage while providing or carrying blood from or to an individual’s dialysis access area—which is usually a leg or an arm—, the process becomes less efficacious and successful, and, in turn, patients are more prone to experience all sorts of difficulties.

Nonetheless, an almost minimally invasive treatment for all those patients who require long-term management of vein access while undergoing dialysis has been developed. The procedure, also known as an angioplasty and stent, poses a very good opportunity for all those individuals who have to undergo the dreary effects of being on dialysis. It is, in short, the perfect opportunity to improve an individual’s quality of life.

In America, there are up to 470,000 people who have any sort or degree of irreversible kidney failure or end-stage renal disease. Most of them need as soon as possible either constant dialysis or, even worse, a transplant in order to survive. The vast majority, all those patients undergoing dialysis, require somewhat of an additional maintenance procedure: either an angioplasty and stent—the process being described in this article—, or a balloon angioplasty. They are required to undergo this additional procedure up to twice a year in order to keep the body with a proper and adequate blood flow to access the entry area.

The main issue relies on a physician’s ability to perform successful percutaneous interventional procedures, or, better said: any catheter-based interventional proceeding. If an individual is to improve their quality of life when undergoing this type of dialysis heavily relies on this. Prior to developing catheter-based procedures, individuals suffering from any degree of end-stage renal disease would come into operating rooms for different procedures such as open procedures that would leave patients weak, thusly making the healing process long and dreary, not to mention that patients would need to stay at the clinics. That was, of course, not the best case scenario for those individuals on dialysis thrice or four times a week. This serves as the most plausible and accurate explanation for such high dropout rates: it was quite easy, not to say understandable, for them to abandon the process.

Additionally, all of these catheter-based proceedings allow physicians to easily and seamlessly access any sort of blockage or narrowing (also known as stenosis) that could be reached through another process or routine operation. In the past, many of these blockages ended up being untreated due to the impossibility for a physician to access them; however, as a result, the scientific community decided to create a much better dialysis access with its own blood flow so that blockages would be left untreated.

This mildly-invasive procedure, in term of time, seems to be a much fitter choice for individuals under the aforementioned conditions. Patients require only a few hours of their time in the clinic. Not to mention that the outcome surpasses in adaptability the old-fashioned way: it is much more adaptable and adequate to an individual’s lifestyle. After several trials in the past, patients seem to be much happier in comparison with the resulting outcome of the old way.

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Image courtesy of Julian Jagtenberg at Pexels.com

During the procedure, or, rather, during its course, physicians must accurately determined whether they are facing a blockage or a narrowing. This suggests that the procedure demands a lot of decision-making skills from a nephrologist. They must also determine the degree of the scenario they are facing: how severe it is and, most importantly, which seems to be the best way to open it and, moreover, keep it open. In addition, they also have to ponder what catheter they need or seem to be more adequate for that specific case; however, be that as it may, patients, regardless of complications—everything has got complications and physicians are required to avoid them—, the possibility of improving an individual’s quality of life is compelling enough for them to consider consulting with their primary nephrologist. Dialysis and renal disease are perhaps amongst the least satisfactory scenarios; however, there have been many developments and advancements regarding this topic: today, people have more than just one option to treat their conditions.

* Featured Image courtesy of Pixabay at Pexels.com

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